Dance Presentation in Gita Can Cure Modern Day Ailments

By Dayafter Bureau, Agencies

At a time when individuals are faced with internal conflicts of the mind and soul, practising psychotherapist and Indian classical dancer Dimple Kaur has turned to teachings of the Gita to find answers to modern ailments through a dance presentation ‘Atma Rati’.

“The contemporary question has always been ‘to do or not to do’ and Gita is a powerful source which helps an individual to see through the universal right and consequently do what is right for greater good as well as dignity.

“Through ‘Atma Rati’, I have attempted to depict the message that conflict has existed and will exist, but how one goes inside the self, reflect and arrive at the best possible solution with a clear understanding of the greater good associated with it,” says Kaur, who performed at India Habitat Centre here last evening.

Kaur, who explored the existence of an individual in the contemporary times through the perspective of the ‘Mahabharata’ in her performance, has been a dancer for the last 20 years and a psychotherapist for the last 15 years.

Speaking about what motivated her to focus on the Gita, Kaur said that the text allows human beings to accept their emotions and motivates them to go deep within themselves.

“While Indian society has for centuries learnt from the Gita, the aspect which motivates me the most is that it allows you to accept the emotions and go deep inside yourself.

“For instance, when Arjun experiences a performance breakdown in the battle field, not because of lack of confidence but due to emotional upheaval, to perform what is right is something that I find as a source of both deep learning and intrigue,” says Kaur.

Apart from following her passion for Indian classical dance, the psychotherapist has also incorporated the art form in her therapies to accelerate healing.

“With my scientific study of the human behaviour, I could see the impact of the ‘natya’ on the mind and body. Combining the two, there have been significant therapeutic benefits which have been achieved and helped in accelerated healing and/or better issues management,” she says.

The dancer, who practises several Indian dance styles including Bharatanatyam, Vilasini Natyam and Chhau, independently as well as a unique mix, says that elements of Indian dance like physical movements, expression, and abhinaya “contribute to the process of healing”.

“Multiple Indian dance forms provide breadth of movements which when used with therapy can help tremendously. Physical movements, expression, abhinaya — all contribute to the process of healing and betterment.

“I have been able to create a pedagogy of learning which can be institutionalised and thought through various mechanisms and has a potential to be a mainstream learning subject as our scriptures offer significant depth and breadth of content. This methodology has been titled as ‘Natya Yog Therapy’ where one uses the body, mind and emotions for betterment in life,” says Kaur.